[ad_1]

NEW YORK, July 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Bragar Eagel & Squire, P.C., a nationally recognized shareholder rights law firm, reminds investors that class actions have been commenced on behalf of stockholders of Unilever PLC UL, Yext, Inc. YEXT, Inotiv, Inc. NOTV, and Wells Fargo & Company WFC. Stockholders have until the deadlines below to petition the court to serve as lead plaintiff. Additional information about each case can be found at the link provided.

Unilever PLC UL

Class Period: September 2, 2020 – July 21, 2021

Lead Plaintiff Deadline: August 15, 2022

On July 19, 2021, Unilever’s subsidiary ice cream company, Ben & Jerry’s announced that, upon the expiration of the current licensing agreement by which its products had been distributed in Israel for decades, it would end sales of its ice cream in “Occupied Palestinian Territory” but would purportedly continue to sell its products in Israel. On this news, the Company’s ADR price fell $0.58 per ADR, or 1%.

Then, on July 22, 2021, CNBC reported that Texas and Florida were examining Ben & Jerry’s actions in connection with their legislation against the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (“BDS”) movement, a controversial movement whose objective is to coerce Israel into making concessions to the Palestinians. In a letter from the state of Florida’s CFO Jimmy Patronis, who controls Florida’s public pension funds, Florida would “be prohibited from investing in Ben & Jerry’s or its parent company, Unilever.” That also meant that Unilever could not enter or renew contracts with the state or any municipality in Florida.

On this news, Unilever’s ADR price fell $3.08, or 5.4%, to close at $53.45 per ADR on July 22, 2021, thereby injuring investors further.

The complaint filed in this class action alleges that throughout the Class Period, Defendants made materially false and/or misleading statements, as well as failed to disclose material adverse facts about the Company’s business, operations, and prospects. Specifically, Defendants failed to disclose to investors: (1) that, in July 2020, Ben & Jerry’s board passed a resolution to end sales of its ice cream in “Occupied Palestinian Territory”; (2) the risks attendant to the Ben & Jerry’s board’s decision; (3) the foregoing risked adverse governmental actions for violations of laws, executive orders, or resolutions aimed at discouraging boycotts, divestment, and sanctions of Israel adopted by 35 U.S. states; and (4) as a result, Defendants’ positive statements about the Company’s business, operations, and prospects were materially misleading and/or lacked a reasonable basis at all relevant times.

For more information on the Unilever class action go to: https://bespc.com/cases/UL

Yext, Inc. YEXT

Class Period: March 4, 2021 – March 8, 2022

Lead Plaintiff Deadline: August 16, 2022

Yext organizes a business’ facts to provide answers to consumer questions online. The Company operates yext platform, a cloud-based platform that allows its customers to, among other things, provide answers to consumer questions, control facts about their business and the content of their landing pages, and manage their consumer reviews. Yext’s website describes its service as “a modern, AI-powered Answers Platform that understands natural language so that when people ask questions about a business online they get direct answers – not links.”

As COVID-19 resurged throughout 2021, Yext consistently assured investors that pandemic-related impacts on the Company’s business were limited as the Company adapted to lockdowns and improved efficiencies in its sales and other operations.

On March 8, 2022, Yext issued a press release announcing its fourth quarter (“Q4”) and FY fiscal 2022 results.  Among other items, Yext reported Q4 fiscal 2022 revenue of $100.9 million, falling short of consensus estimates by $140,000; first quarter (“Q1”) fiscal 2023 revenue outlook of $96.3 million to $97.3 million, versus consensus estimates of $103.79 million; Q1 fiscal 2023 non-GAAP net loss per share outlook of $0.08 to $0.07, versus consensus estimates of $0.05; FY fiscal 2023 revenue outlook of $403.3 million to $407.3 million, versus consensus estimates of $444.71 million; and FY fiscal 2023 non-GAAP net loss per share outlook of $0.19 to $0.17, versus consensus estimates of $0.09.  The Company further disclosed the departure of its CEO and CFO.

That same day, on a conference call to discuss Yext’s Q4 and FY fiscal 2022 results, the Company’s incoming CEO, Michael Walrath (“Walrath”), addressed the Company’s disappointing financial results, revealing, inter alia, that “we have seen fragmentation in our interactions with customers and our ability to deliver premium service and support” and that, “[i]n hindsight, it is clear we were too focused on building sales capacity and not focused enough on other functions that drive productivity, particularly sales enablement, training, client success and services.”  Walrath also disclosed that “we saw a really significant disruption in our business” such as “in Q4, 50% — over 50% of our in-person events were canceled because of the Omicron surges[,]” while opining that Yext could “[a]bsolutely” improve its “sales motion so that it’s more efficient during disruptions like that[.]”

Following that call, a Truist Securities analyst lowered the firm’s rating on Yext to hold from buy and slashed its price target to $6 from $17, noting, among other things, that key performing indicators showed an “unexpected slowdown” in Q4, guidance for fiscal 2023 shows no near-term turn around, and that “planned changes under new management (in go-to-market strategy, sales organization) carry execution risks and the timing for a meaningful and sustainable revival in growth is unclear[.]”

Following these disclosures, Yext’s stock price fell $.055 per share, or 9.29%, to close at $5.37 per share on March 9, 2022.

The complaint alleges that, throughout the Class Period, Defendants made materially false and misleading statements regarding the Company’s business, operations, and prospects.  Specifically, Defendants made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose that: (i) Yext’s revenue and earnings were significantly deteriorating because of, inter alia, poor sales execution and performance, as well as COVID-19 related disruptions; (ii) accordingly, Yext was unlikely to meet consensus estimates for its full year (“FY”)  fiscal 2022 financial results and fiscal 2023 outlook; and (iii) as a result, the Company’s public statements were materially false and misleading at all relevant times.

For more information on the Yext class action go to: https://bespc.com/cases/YEXT

Inotiv, Inc. NOTV

Class Period: September 21, 2021 – June 13, 2022

Lead Plaintiff Deadline: August 22, 2022

The litigation challenges Inotiv’s claims regarding its Envigo business, which the company acquired in Sept. 2021, including that Envigo maintained “high standards of animal welfare” at its Cumberland, Virginia facility and other animal testing sites.

On May 20, 2022, Inotiv announced that on May 18 federal and state law enforcement conducted a search and seizure warrant on the Cumberland facility. The company also announced the DOJ sued Envigo for violations of the Animal Welfare Act (“AWA”).

Then, on May 21, 2022, the court in the DOJ’s case ordered a halt to violations of the AWA at Cumberland. The court’s order observed that hundreds of beagle puppies died in the Cumberland facility (many of which were not given anesthesia before they were euthanized by intracardiac injection), nursing female beagles were denied food, and many puppies died from cold exposure. About 3 weeks later, Inotiv announced it was closing Cumberland.

These events sent the price of Inotiv shares crashing.

According to the lawsuit, defendants throughout the Class Period made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose: (1) Envigo RMS, LLC (“Envigo”) and Inotiv’s Cumberland, Virginia facility (the “Cumberland Facility”) engaged in widespread and flagrant violations of the Animal Welfare Act (“AWA”); (2) Envigo and Inotiv’s Cumberland Facility continuously violated the AWA; (3) Envigo and Inotiv did not properly remedy issues with regards to animal welfare at the Cumberland Facility; (4) as a result, Inotiv was likely to face increased scrutiny and governmental action; (5) Inotiv would imminently shut down two facilities, including the Cumberland Facility; (6) Inotiv did not engage in proper due diligence; and (7) as a result, Defendants’ statements about its business, operations, and prospects, were materially false and misleading and/or lacked a reasonable basis at all relevant times. When the true details entered the market, the lawsuit claims that investors suffered damages.

For more information on the Inotiv class action go to: https://bespc.com/cases/NOTV

Wells Fargo & Company WFC

Class Period: February 24, 2021 – June 9, 2022

Lead Plaintiff Deadline: August 29, 2022

In 2020, Wells Fargo expanded its so-called “Diverse Search Requirement,” also referred to as a diverse slate hiring policy, requiring that at least 50% of interview candidates must represent a historically underrepresented group with respect to at least one diversity dimension (including race/ethnicity, gender, LGBTQ, veterans, and people with disabilities) for most posted roles in the U.S. with total direct compensation greater than $100,000 per year. In addition, at least one interviewer on the hiring panel must represent a historically underrepresented group with respect to at least one diversity dimension.

On May 19, 2022, the New York Times published an article entitled “At Wells Fargo, a Quest to Increase Diversity Leads to Fake Job Interviews.” Citing discussions with “seven current and former Wells Fargo employees,” including Joe Bruno, a former executive in the Company’s wealth management division, the article reported, in relevant part, that “[f]or many open positions, employees would interview a ‘diverse’ candidate,” but that “often, the so-called diverse candidate would be interviewed for a job that had already been promised to someone else.” The article further reported that Mr. Bruno was fired after “complain[ing] to his bosses” about the practice.

On this news, Wells Fargo’s common stock price fell $-.44 per share, or 1.04%, over two trading sessions, closing at $41.67 per share on May 20, 2022.

On June 6, 2022, Reuters published an article entitled “Wells Fargo Pauses Diverse Slate Hiring Policy after Reports of Fake Job Interviews.” The article reported that “Wells Fargo… is pausing a hiring policy that requires recruiters to interview a diverse pool of candidates, after the New York Times reported such interviews were often fake and conducted even though the job had already been promised to someone else.” The same article also reported that “[t]he bank also plans to conduct a review of its diverse slate guidelines, Chief Executive Officer Charles Scharf told staff on Monday, according to a memo seen by Reuters.”

Then, on June 9, 2022, the New York Times published an article entitled “Federal Prosecutors Open Criminal Inquiry of Wells Fargo’s Hiring Practices.” The article reported that federal prosecutors are investigating whether Wells Fargo violated federal laws by conducting fake job interviews in order to meet the Company’s Diverse Search Requirement. The article also revealed that, since the New York Times‘ May 19, 2022 article focusing on the bank’s wealth management business, “another 10 current and former employees have shared stories about how they were subject to fake interviews, or conducted them, or saw paperwork documenting the practice,” and that “sham interviews occurred across multiple business lines, including its mortgage servicing, home lending and retail banking operations.”

That same day, Wells Fargo issued a press release entitled “Wells Fargo Response to New York Times Article,” which confirmed that “[e]arlier this week, the [C]ompany temporarily paused the use of its diverse slate guidelines,” and that, “[d]uring this pause, the [C]ompany is conducting a review so that hiring managers, senior leaders and recruiters fully understand how the guidelines should be implemented – and so we have confidence that our guidelines live up to their promise.”

Following these disclosures, Wells Fargo’s common stock price fell $3.68 per share, or 8.62%, over the following two trading sessions, closing at $38.99 per share on June 13, 2022.

The complaint alleges that, throughout the Class Period, Defendants made materially false and misleading statements regarding the Company’s business, operations, and compliance policies. Specifically, Defendants made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose that: (i) Wells Fargo had misrepresented its commitment to diversity in the Company’s workplace; (ii) Wells Fargo conducted fake job interviews in order to meet its Diverse Search Requirement; (iii) the foregoing conduct subjected Wells Fargo to an increased risk of regulatory and/or governmental scrutiny and enforcement action, including criminal charges; (iv) all of the foregoing, once revealed, was likely to negatively impact Wells Fargo’s reputation; and (v) as a result, the Company’s public statements were materially false and misleading at all relevant times.

For more information on the Wells Fargo class action go to: https://bespc.com/cases/WFC

About Bragar Eagel & Squire, P.C.:

Bragar Eagel & Squire, P.C. is a nationally recognized law firm with offices in New York, California, and South Carolina. The firm represents individual and institutional investors in commercial, securities, derivative, and other complex litigation in state and federal courts across the country. For more information about the firm, please visit www.bespc.com. Attorney advertising. Prior results do not guarantee similar outcomes.

Contact Information:

Bragar Eagel & Squire, P.C.
Brandon Walker, Esq.
Melissa Fortunato, Esq.
(212) 355-4648
investigations@bespc.com
www.bespc.com


[ad_2]

Source link